"We die to each other daily.
What we know of other people
Is only our memory of the moments
During which we knew them. And they have changed since then.
To pretend that they and we are the same
Is a useful and convenient social convention
Which must sometimes broken. We must also remember
That at every meeting we are meeting a stranger."

T.S. Eliot, The Cocktail Party (via bookmania)

(via emilyisabell)

"

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.

"

Billy Collins, from “Introduction to Poetry” (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via emilyisabell)

"Not everyone can feel things as deeply as you. Most people, their feelings are … bland, tasteless. They’ll never understand what it’s like to read a poem and feel almost like they’re flying, or to see a bleeding fish and feel grief that shatters their heart…"

Juliann Garey, Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See. (via wordsnquotes)

(via emilyisabell)

"Hemingwayesque
   [hem-ing-wey-esk]"

(adjective) of, relating to, or like Ernest Hemingway or his literary style. In homage to Ernest Hemingway’s birthday today, July 21; we will honor Hemingway’s style. Yes, that’s right, the man gets his own style name. Hemingway is famous for his style: the short, factual sentences, the declarative nature of the words – Hemingway popularized this at a time when people were peppering parenthetical prepositional phrases into their work like there was no tomorrow. It’s as though everyone else was painting huge oil canvases, and Hemingway drew a penciled sketch that was somehow better than all the other works of the time. Pretty impressive stuff. Thanks Shmoop for the awesome metaphor! 

  • origin: 1940–45; Hemingway + -esque

Happy Birthday Ernest Hemingway! 

(via wordsnquotes)

(via emilyisabell)